French Film, 1924

Rene Clair’s film Entr’acte, sees a new brand of Dadaism/surrealism known as instantanéisme emerge for the first time on the screen. Founded by artist Francis Picabia, the movement was meant as a protest against surrealism, and was rooted in the ballet. The film itself uses the groundwork of Picabia’s ballet “Relâche”, to propel it’s ideas, and he even makes an appearance on the rooftop during part of the film. As was the fashion of the time, a manifesto was even drawn up, and it’s difficult to deny that Clair’s work was not greatly inspired by it’s ideas;

L’INSTANTANÉISME: DOES NOT WANT YESTERDAY.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: DOES NOT WANT TOMORROW.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: MAKES ENTRECHATS.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: MAKES PIGEON WINGS.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: DOES NOT WANT GREAT MEN.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: BELIEVES ONLY IN TODAY.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: WANTS FREEDOM FOR ALL.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: BELIEVES ONLY IN LIFE.
L’INSTANTANÉISME: BELIEVES ONLY IN PERPETUAL MOTION.

The idea of life and perpetual motion seem especially crucial to his development as an artist, and even his later work, it’s difficult to divorce his style from the ideas proposed by Picabia.

The Inhuman Woman (Marcel L’Herbier)

Entr’acte (René Clair & Francis Picabia )

Au secours! aka Help (Abel Gance)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s